Sword of Air (S&W)

$39.99

Frog God Games

Sword of Air (S&W)

Note: This is the Swords & Wizardry version.

This is an old-school sandbox mega campaign that takes PCs from 1st-20th level and is part of the Lost Lands campaign setting created by Bill Webb in 1977. It is 431 pages of old-school awesomeness that will entertain your group for years to come.

 

The Lost Lands is the home campaign world of Necromancer Game's and Frog God Game's own Bill Webb. This campaign has been continuously running since 1977. Many of the adventures published by Necromancer Games and Frog God Games are directly inspired by this campaign. They have evolved over the decades, and more material continues to flow from it as the dice keep rolling.

Sages and wizards of legend speak of the Lost Lands—many of the players who have lived and died in Bill's campaign over the years now have a place in history (in the books).

Frac Cher the dwarf, Flail the Great, Bannor the Paladin, Speigle the Mage, and Helman the Halfling are well known to the fans of Bill's work. This is the game world, and these are the adventures in which the players of these famous characters lived and died. Hundreds of players over the past 35 years have experienced the thrills and terrors of this world. The Sword of Air is the centerpiece of the Lost Lands.

Currently, this epic tome consists of several parts:

1. The Hel’s Temple Dungeon—kind of like Tomb of Horrors on crack. This six-level, trap-and-puzzle infested dungeon formed the basis of Bill's game through his high school and college years. Clark Peterson’s very own Bannor the Paladin spent several real life months in the place, and, sadly, finished the objective. This is where the fragments of the fabled Sword of Air can be found…perhaps.

2. The Wilderness of the Lost Lands extending to the humanoid-infested Deepfells Mountains and providing detail about the nearby Wizard’s Wall. This so-called “wall” was raised by the archmages Margon and Alycthron harnessing the Spirit of the Stoneheart Mountains to raise the land itself, creating a massive escarpment to block invaders from the Haunted Steppes. These archmages are actual player characters from the early 1980s who live on in the legends of the Lost Lands. Over 70 unique encounter areas are detailed, and each one is a mini-adventure in itself. New wilderness areas may be added based on bonus goals described below!

3. The Ruined City of Tsen. Legend has it the city was destroyed by a falling meteor. This place forms an aboveground dungeon area the size of a city, with over 100 detailed encounter areas. It’s a very dark place…even at noon.

4. The Wizard’s Feud—This campaign-style adventure pits the players in a long-running series of intrigues and battles between two archmages. Which side will they take? Their actions all play into the overall quest, and could well determine which side wins. Law and Chaos are not always what they seem, and if the wrong decisions are made, the entire ordeal could fail. Remember, one of the wizards WANTS Tsathogga to win.

5. New monsters, new demons, new spells, and new rules for various aspects of play.

6. The Tower of Bells. This dungeon is the result of the workshop Bill ran at PaizoCon 2013, where the participants assisted him in building an old-school dungeon. Visit the tower and discover the secrets of the “artist” within. Beware: those entering may never come out!

“There have been many names for our world: Kala, Eorthe, Midgard, Erce the Mother.

The Khemitians call it Geb; the ancient Hyperboreans—who were giants among men, conquerors and builders—called it Boros after their homeland under the Pole Star. The Daanites, the last remnant of that ancient and noble race by their own reckoning, call it Lloegyr, which in their tongue means the Lost Lands and, I suppose, in a way that’s really what it is . . . lands that once felt the tread of civilization’s true grandeur and now exist as but a shadow of that former glory.But for most it has no real name at all; it is just the earth we live on, and toil upon, and call home, and to whose embrace we one day return.

These Lost Lands exist on three known continental landmasses, with two great oceans beyond which none have ever explored. The Tempest Meridians, a line of storms and rough seas where navigational techniques fail and ships founder that exists in each direction across the seas from the known continents, bar safe passage and hold their secrets close. He that braves the oceans Uthaf or Oceanus to successfully chart the Tartaren Passage to that green sea of darkness beyond will surely know much renown and be remembered in history as the greatest of explorers.

The center of modern civilization as we know it resides on the largest continent, Akados, seat of the former Borean Monarchy of the Foerdewaith (now our fractured Kingdoms of Foere) and long-lost home of the ancient Hyperborean Empire, that glorious bastion of civilization that was and is no more. To the north lies the frozen polar continent of Boros from which the Hyperboreans first descended to bring their learning to the world and where, perhaps, they returned when their time of ascendance ended. To the east, across the Gulf of Huun, lies the second-largest continent, Libynos, where the Triple Kingdom of Khemit, the Ammuyad Caliphate, and the city-states of the Crusader Coast hold sway, though the dark interior of endless jungle and svelte knows many other cultures barely glimpsed in the west.

The blessed light of Rana, the Sun, holds court in the firmament during the hours of the day, rising in the east and setting in the west, and the night sky of Lloegyr serves as the abode for the moons Narrah, the Pale Sister, and smaller Sybil, the Dark Sister, as they weave their intertwining course sunwise through the darkness. A multitude of stars add their jeweled illumination to the Sisters, the brightest of which is Oliarus, the winking Pole Star that hovers above the northern homeland of the Hyperboreans, ever awaiting their return. Other stars of note that travel across the night sky are Mulvais the Red Star, Cyril the Blue Chariot, and Xharos the Black Star, though the astrologers of ancient Hyperborea tell us that these are actually planets like our own world, spinning in emptiness thousands of leagues away, as preposterous as that may sound.

Their ancient scrolls also hint that there may be other worlds unseen even farther away. Better to leave such fancies to god-touched fools and the mad.

Time in these Lost Lands is guided by the dance of our moon Sisters as they transit the Thirteen Houses of the Zodiac. Each year is comprised of thirteen moons, each of which consists of four weeks, composed of seven days, for a total of 364 days a year. The hours of the day number 24 after the blessed Tesseract. The seasons rely upon the dance of these moons to guide them in at the proper hour and recede in the presence of the new season as it arrives. All beings on Lloegyr revere the twin Sisters in some form or fashion as the key to life upon the earth . . .”

— from Illuminatus Geographica by Master Scrivener Drembrar of Bard’s Gate

After 14 years of waiting, this masterpiece adventure and sourcebook of the Necromancer Games home game world finally comes to light. This adventure and setting has been referenced in every book ever written by Bill Webb, all the way back to Crucible of Freya.

Bill resurrected all his old notebooks and (literally) typewritten manuscripts. Found all his old drawings and maps, playtested several sections of the adventure at recent conventions, and is ready to finally bang this thing out. This adventure links to Rappan Athuk, Slumbering Tsar, Stoneheart Valley and many of the old Necromancer Games books as well. Those links are expanded here as well.

The quest is to recover the lost fragments of a mythical artifact known as the Sword of Air, an icon of Law and Good, and perhaps the only thing that can stop the foul minions of Tsathogga from overrunning the world. This adventure is geared for 1st-20th level players (truly a sandbox), with the main storyline being set for levels 5-15 (that’s approximately 3rd-12th for Swords & Wizardry).

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